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UPDATE: Okanagan Lake levels trending downward, but are still very high

UPDATE: June 15, 2017 at 6:40 a.m.

Over the past 24 hours Okanagan Lake levels show a 0.4 centimetre drop making the new level at 4:25 a.m. 343.214 metres.

Okanagan Lake level recording from 4:25 a.m. since May 15, 2017.

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Tuesday morning May 30, 2017: 343.11 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 31, 2017: 343.14 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Thursday morning June 1, 2017: 343.166 (a rise of 2.6 centimetres)

Friday morning June 2, 2017: 343.20 (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Saturday morning June 3, 2017: 343.22 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning June 4, 2017: 343.23 (a rise of 1 centimetre)

Monday morning June 5, 2017: 343.236 (a rise of 0.5 centimetre)

Tuesday morning June 6, 2017: 343.237 (a rise of 0.1 centimetre)

Wednesday morning June 7, 2017: 343.247 (a rise of 1 centimetre)

Thursday morning June 8, 2017: 343.247 (no change over 24 hours)

Friday morning June 9, 2017: 343.251 (a rise of 0.4 centimetre)

Saturday morning June 10, 2017: 343.243 (a drop of 0.8 centimetre)

Sunday morning June 11, 2017: 343.243 (no change)

Monday morning June 12, 2017: 343.240 (a drop of 0.3 centimetres)

Tuesday morning June 13, 2017: 343.234 (a drop of 0.6 centimetres)

Wednesday morning June 14, 2017: 343.218 (a drop of 1.6 centimetres)

Thursday morning June 15, 2017: 343.218 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)

โ€‹UPDATE: June 14, 2017 at 6:20 a.m.

In the past 24 hours Okanagan Lake levels have dropped 1.6 centimetres, the biggest drop in the past five days. The level now sits at 343.218 metres. Wind continues to be variable that can cause damage to properties with levels still very high. The advice continues to be, leave protection in place for vulnerable properties and bolster where necessary.

The Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) reports that the public may notice flood response crews removing sandbags and other protective measures from areas in the region but are reminded that the flooding event is far from over and all other protective measures should be maintained.

Crews are repositioning protective measures from locations that are no longer under threat to areas where bolstering is needed as part of ongoing flood response. Locations may include those on public and private properties where emergency crews initially installed flood protection measures to protect public infrastructure.

The EOC is actively working on a plan for regional recovery which includes timing for when protective measures can be removed. Currently, Okanagan Lake is approximately 73cm above full pool (optimal lake level) and Kalamalka is 72cm above full pool. The last flood that the area experienced was 1997 and the lake was 45cm above full pool. Even with some promising lake level readings, it may still be several weeks before protective measures can be fully removed.

In the coming days, the Emergency Operations Centre will provide information on:

How to safely remove debris from the foreshore, including docks, garbage and forest debris, and deposit locations.
When sandbags can be removed and where they can be deposited.

Photo credit: Denise Egan - Gyro Beach on June 13, 2017

The weather forecast is calling for a mainly sunny day with very a small chance of rain. In the next seven days, there is light rain expected Thursday and Friday, and mainly sunny to partly cloudy for all the other days.

Real time data - May 15, 2017 to June 14, 2017

โ€‹UPDATE: June 13, 2017 at 6:45 a.m. - Another very small drop in Okanagan Lake levels

The real time data for Okanagan Lake shows a 0.6 centimetre drop over the last 24 hours. The new level is 343.234 metres. Winds were once again a cause for concern last night. The photo below was taken at Rotary Beach.

Photo credit: Denise Egan - Rotary Beach

Real time data - Feb 15, 2017 to June 13, 2017

โ€‹UPDATE: June 12, 2017 at 12:20 p.m.

The Evacuation Alert for the following properties has been rescinded:

From 3902 to 3994 Bluebird Road

From 3814 to 3848 Capozzi Road

From 3950 to 3970 Lakeshore Road

From 515 to 599 Radant Road

From 529 to 579 Truswell Road

From 3854 to 3882 Truswell road

One property, at 3896 Truswell Road, remains on Evacuation Alert.

These properties, near the mouth of Mission Creek, are still vulnerable due to the high level of Okanagan Lake and to wave action and property owners should maintain all protective barriers that have been put in place.

โ€‹UPDATE: June 12, 2017 at 6:20 a.m.

Our second drop in levels in the past three days, even though they are small, they are encouraging after day after day of increases. The data at 4:25 a.m. shows a 0.3 centimetre drop to now sit at 343.24 metres.

The weather is calling for a mainly sunny day with winds picking up later in the day.

Winds are still very much a concern with the very high lake levels. Properties that are vulnerable should leave defences in place and shore them up where possible.

The photo below shows just how vulnerable properties are at this high lake level. Waves can add another 30 to 50 centimetres in height.

Real time data chart - May 4, 2017 to June 12, 2017

UPDATE: June 11, 2017 at 6:50 a.m. - Okanagan Lake levels show no change over the last 24 hours

Okanagan Lake shows no change in levels over the last 24 hour period. As at 4:25 a.m. the level recorded was 343.243 metres. We are not expecting rainfall today and the skies should clear to become mainly sunny for today and Monday. Yesterday's rainfall did add to levels for a short period but have since dipped back down to the previous day's level. The chart below supports a top or peak level, but rain is still a factor to be considered while creeks flows are still high. Properties are also subject to damage from high winds creating waves. Keeping and bolstering lakeshore defences is still advised.

A clear visual of how much #okanaganlake has risen. #kelowna #docks #stormbc #weatherwindow

A post shared by Wa' SUP? ๐Ÿ„๐Ÿผ‍โ™€๏ธ (@dencrkelowna) on

UPDATE: June 10, 2017 at 6:50 a.m. - Okanagan Lake levels drop for the first time since flooding began

According to the real time data, we are seeing our first drop in a 24 hour period for Okanagan Lake levels since this all began at the beginning of May. We have been consistently recording the data at the same time everyday to gather a more clear direction of lake levels and reporting for 24 hour periods.

Today's data shows a 0.8 centimetre drop in levels. While this is encouraging, lake levels will continue to be high for quite some time as the Okanagan Dam can only relieve 1.5 to 1.75 centimetres per day. Heavy winds like we experienced on Thursday can cause significant damage.

Photo credit: Kari Kallen - Peachland on Thursday evening

More photos from the Thursday wind storm can be found here.

The forecast for today is calling for light rain starting at 11:00 a.m. and ending around 11:00 p.m.

The snowpack influence is no longer a threat, (see June 9 update) it is now a weather event, with heavy rains or strong winds that we need to aware of.

Photo credit: Kari Kallen - Peachland on Thursday evening

Real-Time Hydrometric Data Graph for OKANAGAN LAKE AT KELOWNA - May 1 to June 10, 2017



UPDATE: June 9, 2017 at 6:50 a.m. - Snowpack influence on Okanagan Lake basically done

Over the last 24 hour period, the real time data is showing a small increase of 0.4 centimetre, which brings the current level of Okanagan Lake to 343.251metres.

Heavy winds last night caused lots of concern for many property owners.

A contributed video shows how the heavy winds make the lake even more threatening to beaches and homes.

A quote from our story this morning, Snowpack numbers explained. "Based on surveys of snow stations at lower elevations in the watershed, and aerial overview flights that have been taken over the past one to two weeks, there is essentially no or very limited snow below 1700 metres from 90% of the area that drains into the lake," said Dave Campbell who is with the River Forecast Centre for B.C. Essentially, Campbell said that most of the snowpack impacting Okanagan Lake is gone.

UPDATE: June 8, 2017 at 6:50 a.m.

Over the last 24 hour period, Okanagan Lake showed no change and stayed at 343.247 metres.

In a conference call with the BC River Forecast Centre held on Wednesday, June 7th, the key message was that we're at the peak for snowpack influence on the streams feeding Okanagan Lake.
The message was consistent: water levels are beginning to peak and as long as the rain holds off, the flood levels should start to go down. Most of the snow melt has hit the rivers and the final flood contributing factor lies in the weather forecast. For the full story on the media conference, click here.

The weather forecast today is calling for light rain starting around 10 a.m. and ending tonight at 11 p.m. The 14 day forecast is currently not showing any heavy rain, so we are once again hopeful that we are at the peak of flooding.

Photo credit: The Weather Network

UPDATE: June 7, 2017 at 6:15 a.m. Okanagan Lake resumes slow upward rise

So much for the pause on gains on Okanagan Lake. Over the past 24 hours, lake levels have risen one centimetre to 343.247 metres.

Central Okanagan Emergency Operations released maps yesterday showing the extended flood areas for Kelowna if Okanagan Lake rises to the projected level of 343.50 metres. (read full story)

As of Tuesday morning, Mission Creek is flowing at 30-35 cubic-metres-per-second. With rain forecasted to begin as early as Thursday and continue to persist through the weekend, creek flows are expected to increase and raise the underground water table to the surface in some neighborhoods. As a result, the City of Kelowna and Central Okanagan Emergency Operations (CORD) are encouraging residents to monitor basements and crawlspaces in low-lying areas as well as prepare for road closures. (read full story)

UPDATE: June 6, 2017 at 6:45 a.m. - Okanagan Lake shows no gain over the past 24 hours

Over the last 24 hours, Okanagan Lake was basically flat at 343.237 metres, showing just a 0.01 centimetre gain. The chart below is encouraging as it shows a top, but local officials urge caution as there is more rain on the way and snowpack yet to melt. KelownaNow attended the media briefing yesterday and you can watch the full briefing and read the story here.

A key message was that “once the snowpack has gone, the lake will stabilize but it will take a long time," said City Manager, Ron Mattiussi. "It’s just not going to stop one day and then within a week be gone. It could take a very long time for the lake to recede. It could take an awful long time to get back to something that resembles normal.”

The basic math supports that comment. Okanagan Dam, located in Penticton, can only drain off 1.5 to 1.75 centimetres per day and there is flow in from various creeks throughout the summer. Full pool for Okanagan Lake is 342.48 metres and we're currently .757 metres over full pool. Based on that, with no inflow into Okanagan Lake, it would take 50 days to drain off the water to get to the target of full pool.

Okanagan Lake level recording from 4:25 a.m. since May 15, 2017.

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Tuesday morning May 30, 2017: 343.11 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 31, 2017: 343.14 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Thursday morning June 1, 2017: 343.166 (a rise of 2.6 centimetres)

Friday morning June 2, 2017: 343.20 (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Saturday morning June 3, 2017: 343.22 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning June 4, 2017: 343.23 (a rise of 1 centimetre)

Monday morning June 5, 2017: 343.236 (a rise of 0.5 centimetre over 24 hours)

Tuesday morning June 6, 2017: 343.237 (a rise of 0.1 centimetre over 24 hours)

UPDATE: June 5, 2017 at 6:20 a.m. - Are we near the peak or just taking a pause?

More encouraging signs, as this is the first time in the past 20 days that we've seen a drop in the chart pictured below, but over the last 24 hour period we've seen a 0.5 centimetre rise, the lowest rise in the past 20 days.

The weather is expected to heat up for the next three days, but then cool back down. The forecast for Thursday is calling for 15-20 millimetres of rain. If you're just catching up from the weekend, scroll through the last few updates to see the new projected flood levels and the videos from Rotary Beach last night.

Real time data fpr Okanagan Lake levels

Okanagan Lake level recording from 4:25 a.m. since May 15, 2017.

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Tuesday morning May 30, 2017: 343.11 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 31, 2017: 343.14 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Thursday morning June 1, 2017: 343.166 (a rise of 2.6 centimetres)

Friday morning June 2, 2017: 343.20 (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Saturday morning June 3, 2017: 343.22 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning June 4, 2017: 343.23 (a rise of 1 centimetre)

Monday morning June 5, 2017: 343.236 (a rise of 0.5 centimetre over 24 hours)

UPDATE: June 4, 2017 at 9:30 p.m. -

Winds gusting to 30 km/h resulted in heavy wave action testing lakeshore defences at around 7:00 p.m on Sunday night. KelownaNow was at Rotary Beach tonight to see how the barriers were holding up. The water was going over the barriers but the barriers were doing their job in quelling the waves and protecting the infrastructure. The wave action did draw a crowd of onlookers. We talked to few of the people to get their thoughts.

Send your photos and videos to News@KelownaNow.com.

The winds are projected to calm down around 3 am Monday morning. The new projected flood level is in the update we did at 3:45 p.m. which is below.

UPDATE: June 4, 2017 at 3:45 p.m. - The latest revised flood level upped to 343.50 metres

We have just received a new revised projected flood level forecast from the Central Okanagan Emergency Operations Centre, who in consultation with the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations recommends that residents prepare for an Okanagan Lake level of 343.50 metres by mid June. Residents should also ensure protective measures include an additional buffer for wave action.

This is now the fourth revised flood projection. The first level was 343.00 metres which was provided early on and flood preparations were based on that level plus 60 centimetres for wave action. On May 27, 2017 the River Forecast Centre provided a new flood level of 343.15 metres when the lake was already at 343.05 metres, five centimetres over the first projection. On May 31, 2017 the flood level was raised to 343.25 metres when the lake was at 343.168 metres. This newest forecast is 343.50 metres with the lake currently at 343.23 metres.

The ministry states, “With the‎ ever decreasing snowpack at higher elevations, the rate of rise on Okanagan Lake is slowing down. However, the lake level continues to exceed historic highs, and levels could increase more sharply with a significant rain event. For that reason and for planning purposes, local governments and private property owners should work to protect their properties to a lake level rise of up to 343.50 metres.”

This new planning level takes into account that 50% of the upper level snowpack has yet to melt.

Photo credit: KelownaNow - Greystokes

For over 180 photos of our snowpack and lakeshore helicopter tour click here.

The Emergency Operations Centre will be using the 343.50 metre level as a planning number for analyzing flood protection measures, assessing potentially vulnerable areas and making adjustments as needed.

Residents should ensure their flood protection measures can withstand the new predicted Okanagan Lake level, with an additional 60 cm buffer for wave action – up to 344.10 metres.

On Sunday, June 4, an additional 200,000 sandbags were brought into replenish supplies. Sandbags may be in tight supply until Tuesday, June 6 when an additional 500,000 will arrive. The slower day to day rise of the lake provides enough time for additional sandbag supplies to arrive. Residents’ patience is appreciated. Residents in need of sand and sandbags can find locations at www.cordemergency.ca/map.

A pump working on Water Street will need to be shut down for maintenance early Monday morning. Although a backup pump on Queensway Avenue will be working, some ponding may occur on Water Street and motorists should be prepared to take other routes, if needed.

Property owners pumping water from structures should pump into natural areas such as nearby creeks, ditches or lawns and not into storm drains or the sanitary sewer system.

All Evacuation Alerts and Orders remain in place. Visit www.cordemergency.ca/map to search by address to determine if an area is under alert or order.

Residents and visitors should find wake-free options to enjoy Okanagan Lake. Respectful operation of watercraft is urged so that boat wakes do not cause further erosion or flooding of lakeshore properties. Boaters also need to be cautious about wood debris floating under the surface of the lake and submerged infrastructure. Message for Boaters and lake areas to avoid

UPDATE: June 4, 2017 at 6:45 a.m. - Okanagan Lake rise slows

Over the past 24 hours, Okanagan Lake has risen one centimetre. The new level is now 343.23 metres, two centimetres from the projected flood level of 343.25 metres.

We are expecting a mix of sun and clouds all day with cooler temperatures. The high should only get to plus 22 which should assist with slowing the remainder of the snowpack melt.

We are again hopeful that we are near the end of rising lake levels as this is the first 24 hour period in the past 20 days with only a one centimetre rise.

Okanagan Lake level recording from 4:25 a.m. since May 15, 2017.

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Tuesday morning May 30, 2017: 343.11 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 31, 2017: 343.14 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Thursday morning June 1, 2017: 343.166 (a rise of 2.6 centimetres)

Friday morning June 2, 2017: 343.20 (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Saturday morning June 3, 2017: 343.22 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning June 4, 2017: 343.22 (a rise of 1 centimetre over 24 hours)

Photo credit: Jo Neu - Rotary Beach

UPDATE: June 3, 2017 at 6:45 a.m. - Another day, another 2 centimetres higher for Okanagan Lake

Okanagan Lake rose another two centimetres over the past 24 hours and is now at 343.22 metres, three centimetres from the newly projected flood level of 343.25 metres.

We are expecting an updated snowpack report from the River Forecast Centre in their June 1st, 2017 bulletin and it is scheduled for release on June 7th.

KelownaNow has been receiving feedback from readers asking why in a situation like this have we not been able to increase the flow of information on snowpack levels and reporting.

We sent three reporters up with Ikon Adventures on May 31, 2017 to have a first hand look at the snowpack levels in the Greystokes. You can see the photos here.

Photo credit: KelownaNow

Even after the snowpack melt has completed we will be dealing with high lake levels for quite a while as the Okanagan Dam can only release 1.5 to 1.75 centimetres per day according to dam operator Shaun Reimer. You can read our May 11,2017 article on how the Okanagan Basin system works. The lake levels listed below that we have been tracking for the past 20 days shows a consistent addition of two to three centimetres over those 20 days, so once flows from Mission Creek subside it will still take many days to remove these high levels from the lake. Rainfall and or high winds will continue to make shorelines properties vulnerable for quite some time yet.

Okanagan Lake level recording from 4:25 a.m. since May 15, 2017.

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Tuesday morning May 30, 2017: 343.11 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 31, 2017: 343.14 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Thursday morning June 1, 2017: 343.166 (a rise of 2.6 centimetres)

Friday morning June 2, 2017: 343.20 (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Saturday morning June 3, 2017: 343.22 (a rise of 2 centimetres over 24 hours)

WFN IR9 has downgraded their earlier Boil Water Notice to a Water Quality Advisory as sediment has settled enough now for the water to be safe to drink for most individuals. You can see more information on this water quality advisory and for the status of your drinking water for the other water systems in the Central Okanagan.

We put together a visual journey of how we got here which you can read here.

We did a story on the Green Bay area yesterday where crews are working hard to keep residents homes safe. Emergency Crews working hard to lower water levels in Green Bay area.

UPDATE: June 2, 2017 at 6:45 a.m. - Okanagan Lake now at 343.20 metres

At 4:25 a.m. the real time data for Okanagan Lake is 343.20 metres, a rise of 3.6 centimetres over the last 24 hours. The new projected flood level is 343.25 metres.

Okanagan Lake level recording from 4:25 a.m. since May 15, 2017.

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Tuesday morning May 30, 2017: 343.11 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 31, 2017: 343.14 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Thursday morning June 1, 2017: 343.166 (a rise of 2.6 centimetres)

Friday morning June 2, 2017: 343.20 (a rise of 3.6 centimetres over 24 hours)

Photo credit: KelownaNow

UPDATE: June 1, 2017 at 6:30 a.m. A hopeful sign as Okanagan Lake shows no rise over the past 12 hours

At 4:25 a.m. the real time data for Okanagan Lake is 343.166 metres. This is .002 lower than 12 hours earlier.

It's certainly an encouraging sign, but since it took 12 hours to show the most recent drop, we're giving it another 12 hours of data before we get too hopeful.

Cooler temperatures have certainly helped slow the snowpack melt. We are expecting light rain today throughout the day but not much in the forecast for the next eight days.

Photo credit: The Weather Network

Photo credit: KelownaNow

Links to recent stories related to the flooding

PHOTOS: Birds eye view of Kelowna's snowpack

Video of our first-hand look at the snowpack on Tuesday afternoon.

Drinking water quality in the Okanagan

Message for Boaters and lake areas to avoid

How the Okanagan water basin works

Our initial flyover A bird's eye, helicopter view of the flooded areas in Kelowna

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Tuesday morning May 30, 2017: 343.11 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 31, 2017: 343.14 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday afternoon May 31, 343.168 metres

Thursday morning June 1, 2017: 343.166 (a rise of 2 centimetres over 24 hours, and a drop of .002 in the last 12 hours)

UPDATE: May 31, 2017 at 5:50 p.m. - Projected flood level raised to 343.25 metres

As at 4:25 p.m. the real time data shows the Okanagan Lake level at 343.168 metres.

Central Okanagan Emergency Operations Centre (CORD) received the updated forecast on Wednesday afternoon, saying that the lake levels could reach 343.25 metres.

Originally levels were forecasted to reach 343m before that prediction was updated to 343.15m, which the lake reached today.

The lake is expected to keep rising for at least a couple more weeks.

“With snow remaining at higher mountain elevations, Okanagan Lake is predicted to peak mid-June, said the release from CORD. “Mission Creek levels are also expected to continue to rise and residents are advised to prepare for increased levels.”

The snowpack above Kelowna is still melting as well, which KelownaNow got a first-hand look at on Tuesday afternoon.

Photo credit: KelownaNow

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Tuesday morning May 30, 2017: 343.11 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 31, 2017: 343.14 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday afternoon May 31, 343.168 metres

Thursday morning June 1, 2017: 343.166 (a rise of 2 centimetres over 24 hours, and a drop of .002 in the last 12 hours)

UPDATE: May 31, 2017 at 12:30 p.m. Mission Creek properties on evacuation alert

The current lake level is now 343.15 metres, which was the revised projected flood level. The first projected flood level was 343.00 metres.

KelownaNow went up with Ikon Adventures to see first hand how the lakeshore defences are holding up. You can watch the video below to see the footage.

We also did a photo story this morning on our round trip from the Kelowna airport to the north end of Kalamalka Lake, then southeast to the Greystokes where the melting snowpack drains into Mission Creek. We ventured further south to see what the snowpack was like at Big White (which drains into the Kettle River). From Big White we traveled west back down Mission Creek to the mouth, then back north along the lakeshore to the airport where we started. You can read that story and see the close to 200 photos here.

UPDATE: May 31, 2017 at 6:30 a.m. Mission Creek properties on evacuation alert

Photo credit: KelownaNow - Mission Creek Mouth - photo taken May 30 at 7:30 p.m.

The current lake level this morning is 343.14 metres, 14 centimetres higher than the first projected flood level number of 343.00 metres and only one centimetres from the revised flood level that was projected on May 27, 2017 (see May 27 update below) by BC River Forecasting.

Today and Thursday are expected to be cooler with a chance of showers.

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Tuesday morning May 30, 2017: 343.11 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 31, 2017: 343.14 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Photo credit: KelownaNow - Mission Creek Mouth - photo taken May 30 at 7:30 p.m.

UPDATE: May 30, 2017 at 4:30 p.m. - Expected wind tonight combined with record lake levels will test lakeshore defences

Evacuation Alert for properties near the mouth of Mission Creek.

The alert was issued because increasing creek flow, a high lake level and wind gusts of up to 25 kilometres an hour this evening will put pressure on fortifications in that area.

The City of Kelowna has issued an Evacuation Alert for the following properties:

From 3902 to 3994 Bluebird Road

From 3814 to 3848 Capozzi Road

From 3950 to 3970 Lakeshore Road

From 515 to 599 Radant Road

From 529 to 579 Truswell Road

From 3854 to 3896 Truswell Road

Photo credit: KelownaNow - Near the mouth of Mission Creek

UPDATE: May 30, 2017 at 1:00 p.m.

Central Okanagan Emergency Operations is advising that we could see wind gusts up to 25 kilometres an hour this afternoon and evening. Wind combined with unprecedented lake levels, will test fortifications in low laying areas of the Central Okanagan. The Lake is 16 centimetres higher than it was during the last wind event on May 24, 2017 so protective measures need to be adjusted accordingly.

Residents and visitors are also asked during this state of emergency to stay out of flooded neighbourhoods so that residents and emergency crews can properly do their work. Impacted properties are for local traffic only.

Residents in flooded properties with electrical service still in operation should be alert to the danger and exercise extreme caution.

Parents are also asked to keep children out of dirty shallow water to prevent any health risks posed by standing water.

Emergency officials are asking residents and visitors to find wake-free options to enjoy Okanagan Lake in the weeks ahead. A lot of time and energy has gone into sandbagging vulnerable areas, and respectful operation of watercraft is urged so that boat wakes do not damage protection or cause flooding of lakeshore properties. Boaters also need to be cautious about wood debris floating under the surface of the lake, along with submerged infrastructure.

People are also asked to stay off the bladder dams, gabion cages and sandbags deployed along beaches and creeks.

The flow of Mission Creek is expected to increase over the next few days with the recent hot weather and rain in the forecast. The creek was flowing at 65 cubic-metres-a-second last night and is expected to stay at that rate for the next day or two.

Crews have bolstered protection measures between Lakeshore Bridge and the mouth of Okanagan Lake. Residents living along Mission Creek, especially those closer to the lake, are urged to reinforce the flood protection around their properties, due to increasing lake levels and potential for back water effect.

All evacuation alerts and orders remain in effect. Check out the map at www.cordemergency.ca/map and search by address to determine if an area is under alert or order, or to find the closest sand and sandbag locations.

Residents are reminded that this is a weather driven event and things will continue to evolve with the weather. A sudden change in weather could increase the risk of flooding.

We recently did a story - More Okanagan park closures

Click on the links below for more information on the following:

Follow this story for status on your drinking water - Water quality in the Okanagan

Message for Boaters and lake areas to avoid

How the Okanagan water basin works

A bird's eye, helicopter view of the flooded areas in Kelowna

UPDATE: May 30, 2017 at 6:00 a.m. - Okanagan Lake in record territory

The current lake level is 343.11 metres, 11 centimetres higher than the first projected flood level number of 343.00 metres and only four centimetres from the revised flood level that was projected on May 27, 2017 (see May 27 update below) by BC River Forecasting. There was a rise of three centimetres over the last 24 hours. We are expecting temperatures to reach 31 C today with light rain starting in the evening. Starting Wednesday, the seven day forecast has temperatures cooling to the low 20s with light rain mixed in with sunny days.

For those curious how Okanagan Lake is managed, you can read our May 11, 2017 story - How Okangan Lake fills & drains as part of the Okanagan Water Basin - we talked to the man the controls the drain

The Weather Network

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Tuesday morning May 30, 2017: 343.11 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

UPDATE: May 29, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.

The current lake level is 343.10 metres, which is 10 centimetres higher than the first projected flood level numbers and only five centimetres from the revised flood level that was projected on May 27, 2017 (see May 27 update below) by BC River Forecasting.

Beginning Wednesday, we will see a shift to cooler temperatures along with rain. The cooler temperatures are projected in the low 20s, which should slow the snowpack melt, but the rains may counteract any gains made from cooler temperatures.

Hopefully the rains stay light as forecast and the snowpack melt is slowed until we can get more water out of the lake until we get most of the snowpack melted. Winds are currently projected as light for the next 36 hours, but weather changes fast in the Okanagan Valley.

We update this story several times a day to try and keep our readers up to date.

We take our readings at a consistent time so as to lessen confusion as to rate of gain. Below you will see the last 15 days.

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 29, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Monday afternoon May 29, 2017: 343.10 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

UPDATE: May 29, 2017 at 1:30 p.m.

An Evacuation Order has been issued for Tween Lakes Resort at 15970 Oyama Road for the exception of the Park Manager residence. The resort is currently not displacing any permanent residents.

For more on the Tween Lakes Resort click here for our story.

Photo Credit: Alan Gatzke.

Evacuation Alerts have been issued for the following 18 properties near Wood Lake:

3210 - 3387 Clement Road (all)

1 – 14, 11871 Highway 97 North

Property owners should bolster their flood protection measures if they haven’t done so already.

Residents in these affected areas should be prepared to leave their homes on short notice should conditions along the waterfront change. If they haven’t already, they may also wish to take steps to protect their properties from potential flooding by sandbagging and moving any items from crawlspaces and basements. Sand and sand bag locations can be found on www.cordemergency.ca/beprepared. Sand is continually being replenished.

UPDATE: May 29, 2017 at 9:30 a.m.

The Central Okanagan Emergency Operations reports that flood protection was bolstered Sunday along Mission Creek between the bridge at Lakeshore Road and Okanagan Lake, at Green Bay in West Kelowna and along Antler Beach in Peachland to protect Highway 97.

Mission Creek is forecast to rise in the next few days as snow at higher elevations melts and enters the creek. Residents living along Mission Creek, especially those closer to the lake, are urged to reinforce the flood protection around their properties, due to the high lake level and potential for it to back up into the creek.

Boaters on Okanagan Lake should be aware of log booms being installed around the eastern end of the William R. Bennett Bridge closest to City Park today and to proceed with caution. The log booms will be in place to reduce the threat of erosion around the structure. Please read our "Boaters urged to stay off area lakes" for more.

Residents and visitors to the Central Okanagan are reminded to leave flood protection measures in place and bolster them in preparation for high water and possible windy conditions. Environment Canada’s forecast for the next few days includes a change from hot, sunny conditions to rain and wind by Tuesday evening and into Wednesday.

People are also asked to not climb on top of bladder dams, gabion cages and sandbags deployed along beaches and creeks.

With the arrival of hot and sunny weather also brings the temptation to enjoy water sports in the area lakes. Boating is still discouraged due to potential debris hazards and the shoreline erosion impact of any waves that are generated. In addition, recreational trail users should use caution, stay back from creekbanks and watch for unexpected rapid flow and level increases.

As flows in Mission Creek are anticipated to increase significantly over the next few days with the forecasted hot weather, crews are continuing to bolster protection measures between Lakeshore Bridge and the mouth of Okanagan Lake today.

See below for lake levels.

UPDATE: May 29, 2017 at 6:20 a.m.

At 4:25 a.m this morning the Real-Time Hydrometric Data for Okanagan Lake, was 343.08 metres a rise of two centimetres from Sunday morning's reading at 4:25 a.m. We are now in record territory for the lake level, according to City of Kelowna's public information officer Tom Wilson, the documentation he has seen supports the record at 343.06 metres.

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday morning May 28, 2017: 343.08 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Photo credit: Government of Canada - Okanagan Lake levels from May 21 to May 29

UPDATE: May 28, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.

At 5:25 p.m tonight for Okanagan Lake, the Real-Time Hydrometric Data was at 343.07 metres a rise of one centimetre from this morning's reading at 4:25 a.m. We are now in record territory for the lake level, according to City of Kelowna's public information officer Tom Wilson, the documentation he has seen supports the record at 343.06 metres. If you scroll down to our May 25th update you will see there is a bit of a debate on the actual record. The record means little to people that have homes in danger though, it's something that can be sorted out when the flooded lake has receded.

We had more images shared with us today showing the effects of the high lake level. Send your photos to News@KelownaNow.com or tag #KelownaNow on Instagram and Twitter.

The cone marks the end of a flooded dock.

A post shared by Karen (@karenlwiebe) on

Picnic tables have become places for ducks to sit.

A post shared by Karen (@karenlwiebe) on

'Infiniti edge' dock at #campashley #kelownalife #kelownanow . Not a planned feature.

A post shared by Greg Ashley (@gregashley_) on

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday mid-day May 28, 2017: 343.07 (a rise of 1 centimetre from the early morning)

UPDATE: May 28, 2017 at 6:30 a.m. - Okanagan Lake still rising but at a slower rate

As of 4:25 a.m. the Okanagan Lake level as per the Real-Time Hydrometric Data was at 343.06, a rise of three centimetres over a 24 hour period. The hopeful sign though is that since noon yesterday the rise was only one centimetre. The next two days are calling for mainly sunny skies with temperatures to 30 C which will continue to influence the snowpack melt.

Photo credit: KelownaNow - Mission Creek at 6:00 a.m on May 28, 2017

Real-Time Hydrometric Data Graph - May 27 to May 28

Here is the rate of rise over the past two weeks:

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Sunday morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Click here for the your drinking water status in the Central Okanagan.

Sunday early morning May 28, 2017: 343.06 (a rise of 3 centimetres from Saturday morning)

Photo credit: Crystal Berreth - Kinsmen Park

photo credit: Crystal Berreth - Kinsmen Park

UPDATE: May 27, 2017 at 3:30 p.m.

The BC River Forecast is saying that the lake level could rise to 343.15 metres. Environment Canada reported that the lake reached 343.05 metres by 11:25 a.m. on May 27.

Residents of Vernon are reminded to secure their properties with the appropriate flood protection measures and prepare for high waters and windy conditions.

UPDATE: May 27, 2017 at 7:00 a.m.

The last recorded measurement from the Real-Time Hydrometric Data of Okanagan Lake was at 4:25 a.m. and it read 343.03 metres. That shows a rise of two centimetres since Friday morning. The new level is three centimetres above the projected 2017 flood level.

With 80% to 90% of upper elevation snowpack levels still to melt and the weather forecast projecting sunny skies with higher temperatures, we will likely see the lake level increasing.

CORD Emergency's message is if your property is in a vulnerable area, prepare for the worst and hope for the best.

Here is the rate of rise over the past two weeks:

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday early morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday early morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday early morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Saturday early morning May 27, 2017: 343.03 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Saturday mid-day May 27, 2017: 343.05 (a rise of 2 centimetres)


UPDATE: May 26, 2017 at 3:00 p.m. - Okanagan Lake rise slows but we can expect more increases

The Central Okanagan Emergency Operations Center reports that Okanagan Lake levels could increase another 10 – 15 centimetres as the snowpack continues to melt.

According to Dave Campbell with the River Forecast Centre, the current snowpack levels are showing that while 80% to 90% of the high elevation snow is still up there, the mid-elevation snowpack has melted.

"We've been having a number of reports into us in the last couple days of people doing flights and stuff to check the areas, and we have a couple automated stations, about 1400-1500 meters, that area is showing as "out of snow" but then its a quick transition once we get above 1600 meters, say, where we still got quite a bit of that snow left," said Dave Campbell with the River Forecast Centre.

Heading into the weekend, residents and visitors in the Central Okanagan are reminded to leave flood protection measures in place and bolster them in preparation for high water and possibly windy conditions. High lake levels and varying weather conditions are expected to persist for the foreseeable future.

The snowmelt will cause Mission Creek to reach extremely high flows, potentially exceeding 100 cubic metres per second in the days ahead. Due to increasing lake levels and the potential for a back-water effect, residents living along Mission Creek, especially those closer to the lake, are urged to fortify the flood protection around their properties.

Properties affected by Tuesday evening’s wind storm should be prepared to weather even worse conditions in the weeks ahead. The lake is already 10 centimetres higher than last Tuesday and could potentially increase another 15 centimetres over the coming days.

Lake levels have stayed at 343.01 metres since this morning. The last recorded measurement from the Real-Time Hydrometric Data was at 12:25 p.m. and it read 343.01 metres.

The Lake Avenue Beach access has been closed due to flooding. According to City of Kelowna's communications manager, Tom Wilson, he stated that Mill Creek has started to back up.

"I mean it's happening to a degree right now, but it's a question of how much higher it goes how much further back it will be pushed," said Tom Wilson, communications for the City of Kelowna.

UPDATE: May 26, 2017 at 6:40 a.m. - Okanagan Lake crosses over projected levels

The Okanagan Lake level this morning is at 343.01 metres, a rise of three centimetres from Thursday morning. The new level is one centimetre above the projected 2017 flood level.

With 80% to 90% of upper elevation snowpack levels still to melt and the weather forecast projecting sunny skies with higher temperatures we will likely see that number increasing.

The message is the same, if your property is in a vulnerable area, prepare for the worst and hope for the best. If you're not able to help yourself, email us at News@KelownaNow.com.

Photo credit: The Weather Network

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday early morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday early morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Friday early morning May 26, 2017: 343.01 (a rise of 3 centimetres)

UPDATE: May 25, 2017 at 8:20 p.m.

We have recently learnt from a reader that the actual historic 1948 flood level was actually 343.28 and not the initially provided number of 343.00. You can see the revision below in the provided graphs.

From the documents provided to us by the reader, the following excerpt from the report presented by B.J. Symonds dated September 5, 1990 states, In 1948, prior to implementation of the Joint Board’s recommendations, a major flood hit the Okanagan Valley. This time Okanagan Lake reached a maximum level of 1126.25 feet (343.28 metres). Again, widespread damage occurred throughout the valley prompting calls for action on the Board’s recommendations.

From our earlier update we revise to read as follows:

As of this afternoon, the Okanagan Lake levels crossed the projected flood levels of 343.00 metres and hit 343.05 metres. Currently, the lake level is reading 342.99 metres. (the chart below illustrates that the level recordings are not a straight up line, but more of a trend)

With 80% to 90% of the upper elevation snowpack still left to melt, and a forecasted increase in temperatures over the next five days, we will likely see the levels push past projected levels. Much of the lower elevation snowpack has melted.

Revised graph:

Initial graph

UPDATE: May 25, 2017 at 4:20 p.m. Okanagan Lake crosses over record projected levels

As of this afternoon, the Okanagan Lake levels crossed the historic 1948 projected flood levels of 343.00 metres and hit 343.05 metres. Currently, the lake level is reading 342.99 metres. (the chart below illustrates that the level recordings are not a straight up line, but more of a trend)

With 80% to 90% of the upper elevation snowpack still left to melt, and a forecasted increase in temperatures over the next five days, we will likely see the levels push past record projected levels. Much of the lower elevation snowpack has melted.

Two new Evacuation Alerts have been issued for some waterfront properties in the City of West Kelowna and Westbank First Nation.

West Kelowna

1302 to 1454 Green Bay Road

3660 to 3697 Green Bay Landing

3575 to 3636 Wiig Road

Westbank First Nation IR#10

Waterfront lots from the W.R. Bennett Bridge north to Old Ferry Wharf Road

Several lakefront cabins on Lindley Road

For detailed information about these Evacuation Alerts please visit the Regional Emergency Program website map: www.cordemergency.ca/map.

Property owners are still encouraged to protect their structures and properties to the recommended level of 343.6 metres. That 60 additional centimetre buffer allows for potential wave action, weather related conditions and any additional levels that may fluctuate around the 343 metre mark that was initially predicted for Okanagan Lake.

To help with protecting private properties to the recommended 343.6 metre mark, go to the Flood FAQs section of www.cordemergency.ca/beprepared. It has directions on how to measure for flood levels and build barriers to the appropriate height to account for both lake level flooding and wave action.

Sand and sandbags are continually being replenished at locations throughout the Central Okanagan to help those in need. Find detailed information on sand pile locations and information about vulnerable areas throughout the region at www.cordemergency.ca/map.

From May 8th through this afternoon, 566 truckloads of sand have been delivered to these locations across the region. As well, more than 930,000 sandbags have been ordered.

People who would like to help their neighbours of those residents filling sandbags are encouraged to stop by any of the various sand and sandbag spots.

Boating on area lakes is still discouraged due to potential debris hazards and the shoreline erosion impact of any waves that are generated. In addition, with some area creeks and streams expected to rise over the next week with melting snow, recreational trail users should use caution, stay back from creek banks and watch for unexpected rapid flow and level increases.

Photo credit: BC Govt

UPDATE: May 25, 2017 at 8:00 a.m. - Okanagan Lake rise slows with cooler temperature

Okanagan Lake levels rose to 342.98 overnight, a rise of two centimetres from Wednesday morning compared to the five centimetre rise for Tuesday morning's reading.

We are now 2 centimetres off the 1948 historic record level.

The cooler temperatures yesterday slowed the snowpack melt. Today should be helpful in slowing the snowpack melt, but the forecast going forward has us returning to hot weather.

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres - (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres - (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres - (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres. (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres. (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres. (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday early morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

Thursday early morning May 25, 2017: 342.98 (a rise of 2 centimetres)

The Weather Network

UPDATE: May 24, 2017 at 5:00 p.m. - Okanagan Lake now just 4 centimetres from historic flood level

The one bright spot in the flooding is that from morning to this evening there was no increase in the level of Okanagan Lake. Cooler temperatures in the mountains slowed the snowpack melt.

The rise in lake levels to record heights could accelerate later this week as hot weather returns causing creeks to swell once again with snow melt.

Photo credit: The Weather Network

Wind, rain, sun – any one of these elements in excess can cause its own unique problems for Central Okanagan properties this spring.

Strong winds create damaging waves on already overfilled lakes. Too much rain adds to the creek flows and further saturates soggy slopes. Sunny conditions cause rapid snowpack melt, filling creeks and flowing into local lakes.

This alternating state of weather patterns is expected to last for weeks, and with lake this full, it will be weeks before they peak and begin to drain. As a result, any wind, rain or sun is going to bring different conditions that residents near creeks and lakes will need to prepare for.

The advice for residents who live near water is to remain vigilant about changing conditions and keep flood protection in place until further notice. The break in the weather today offers residents a chance to shore up flood protection. Residents are urged to continue to help neighbours with this work, with sandbag stations welcoming volunteers to help fill and carry sandbags.

Sandbagging stations are stocked and replenished daily at several locations throughout the Central Okanagan. Visit www.cordemergency.ca/map to find sand pile locations and information about vulnerable areas throughout the region.

Beaches remain closed as emergency crews maintain flood protection barriers.

Click here for some of the images captured from the Tuesday storm.

Photo credit: Denise Egan - Big wave at Gyro

UPDATE: May 24, 2017 at 6:30 a.m.

Okanagan Lake levels as of this morning are at 342.96 metres, a rise of five centimetres from Tuesday morning's readings. We are now only four centimetres from the highest historic flood level of 343.00 metres which was recorded in 1948.

With lakes approaching historic volumes, the high water levels are expected to remain well into July

Cooler temperatures projected today should slow snowpack melt. The reprieve will be short as temperatures are projected into the 30's for the upcoming weekend.

Photo credit: The Weather Network

Photos and videos from last night's wind storm.

High winds on overfilled lakes last night caused localized flooding for residences in low lying areas on Central Okanagan lakes.

Residents should be aware of the risk of falling trees within saturated ground conditions near lakes and creeks.

KelownaNow went out last night to see how lakeshore defences were holding up. Send your photos and videos to News@KelownaNow.com

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres - (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres - (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres - (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres. (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres. (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres. (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Wednesday early morning May 24, 2017: 342.96 (a rise of 5 centimetres)

UPDATE: May 23, 2017 at 4.30 p.m. - Rapid snowpack melt combined with expected strong winds could test lakeshore defences

As of the last reading Okanagan Lake levels are now at 342.92 centimetres.

The strong winds forecasted for this evening will test flood protection measures. Click here to read our recent weather warning story.

The shoreline erosion from wave action along unprotected waterfront properties as area lakes levels continue to rise is an area of concern.

A risk of falling trees within saturated ground conditions near lakes and creeks is high. The risk can be increased by high winds expected this evening.

Warmer temperatures later in the week will speed up the volume of snow melting at the higher elevation watersheds, further boosting creek flows and area lakes to rise.

Photo credit: Denise Egan

UPDATE: May 23, 2017 at 11.30 a.m.

Okanagan Lake levels this morning are at 342.91, a rise of 4 centimetres from Monday morning. We are now 3 centimetres over the 1990 lake flood level of 342.87 metres and 9 centimetres away from the projected flood level of 343.00 metres.

Photo credit: KelownaNow - Rotary Beach at 6 a.m. on May 23, 2017

The Instagram video was taken at 6 a.m. this morning.

Rotary Beach this morning. See #KelownaNow for story.

A post shared by KelownaNow (@kelownanow) on

UPDATE: May 22, 2017 at 5:07 p.m.

Waterfront flood protection measures could face an additional test in the coming days if forecast strong winds come to reality. And if they haven’t already, that’s a pretty good reason for lakefront property owners to install defences.

This afternoon, Okanagan Lake rose enough to edge over the 1990 lake flood level of 342.87 metres (last at 342.88 metres - see below). Water levels continue to rise and are expected to remain extremely high into July. Severe weather alert issued for Tuesday

Winds from 40 to 60 kilometres per hour are forecast to move into the Central Okanagan tomorrow evening continuing into Wednesday morning. The result would be wind-driven wave action along the shoreline of the region’s lakes. Further complicating the weather picture is possible heavy rain during thunderstorms as a cold front moves through.

Photo credit: KelownaNow - Beach at Mill Creek

UPDATE: May 22, 2017 at 1:30 p.m. - Rapid upper level snowpack melt will accelerate rising lake levels

Above normal temperatures in the forecast will accelerate the upper level snowpack melt during the next few days, leading to high streamflows and pushing Okanagan Lake’s level closer to the 343-metre flood mark.

The large-scale deployment of flood protection measures by emergency response teams is now effectively complete.

Emergency Operations Centre officials conducted a detailed shoreline survey and surveillance flights to determine where flooding will likely occur up to 343.6m – the projected Okanagan Lake flood level (343m), plus the buffer for wave action. Officials observed that many at-risk lakefront properties lack adequate foreshore protection to this level (see below for more).

Okanagan Lake rose 3 centimetres Sunday, bringing the level to 342.86 metres – 1 cm off 1990’s flood level and 14 cm away from this year’s projected peak of 343 metres. Kalamalka Lake is rising an average of 2 cm a day.

Photo credit: Denise Egan

Here are the following water levels since Monday, May 15, 2017 for Okanagan Lake:

Monday, May 15, 2017: 342.68 metres

Tuesday, May 16, 2017: 342.70 metres - (a rise of 2 centimetres)

Wednesday, May 17, 2017: 342.736 metres - (a rise of 3.6 centimetres)

Thursday, May 18, 2017: 342.75 metres - (a rise of 1.4 centimetres)

Friday, May 19, 2017: 342.77 metres (a rise of 2.5 centimetres)

Saturday, May 20, 2017: 342.80 metres (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Sunday, May 21, 2017: 342.83 metres. (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Monday, May 22, 2017: 342.86 metres. (a rise of 3 centimetres)

Tuesday, May 23, 2017: 342.91 metres. (a rise of 4 centimetres)

Monday Afternoon May 22, 2017: 342.88 metres. (a rise of 2 centimetres from the a.m.) We are now just over the 1990 flood levels.

Click here for more Flood 2017 coverage.

Photo credit: Denise Egan

Photo credit: KelownaNow

The BC River Forecast Centre says Mission Creek’s watershed at 1,794 metres, has approximately 500 mm of snow water equivalent yet to melt. High elevation snow melt rates are expected to reach 30-40 mm, and possibly higher, through Tuesday. For more information, please go to: http://bcrfc.env.gov.bc.ca/index.htm.

The Emergency Operations Centre remains open; and BC Forestry and various municipal crews continue to provide on-the-ground support. The Emergency Support Services reception centre will reopen Tuesday, May 23 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. unless otherwise needed.

Lakeshore Property Owners Urged to Take Action

Property owners who have not already taken steps to protect themselves from flooding should do so now before the lakes reach historic levels. Volunteers are still welcome at sand piles to help others with filling and loading of sandbags.

Go to the Flood FAQs section of www.cordemergency.ca/beprepared, to get directions on how to measure for flood levels and build barriers to the appropriate height to account for both lake level flooding and wave action.

Emergency Operations Centre officials conducted a detailed shoreline survey and surveillance flights to determine where flooding will likely occur up to 343.6m – the projected Okanagan Lake flood level (343m), plus the buffer for wave action. Officials observed that many at-risk lakefront properties lack adequate foreshore protection to this level.

Sandbagging stations are stocked and replenished daily at several locations throughout the Central Okanagan. Visit www.cordemergency.ca/map to find the location closest to you.

Municipal and public safety crews continue to install sandbags where needed to shore up existing protection. The public is asked to leave these installations alone for their own safety and to ensure the continued protection of community infrastructure and property.

Debris washed up on beaches should be left for the time being, as logs and other wood material can help to limit erosion caused by wave action. When the flood risk has passed, officials will provide details about how beach debris will be removed.

UPDATED: Boaters urged to stay off area lakes

Photo credit: Denise Armstrong - Barona beach dock (West Kelowna)

UPDATE: May 22, 2017 at 7:00 a.m. Environment Canada issues an alert

As of early this morning, the Okanagan Lake level is at 342.86 metres which is a 3 centimetre increase from Sunday. (we will continue to update levels).

Environment Canada has issued an alert as a ridge of high pressure over the southern Interior of British Columbia will remain in place today and Tuesday, leading to unseasonably warm weather. This warm spell will accelerate snowmelt and lead to rising stream flows, causing concerns related to flooding.

This will be followed by a cool-down accompanied by strong winds Tuesday night and Wednesday as a cold front quickly moves across the province and sweeps southeastward across the central Interior during the day Tuesday, likely reaching the South Tuesday night. There is also a risk of thunderstorms.

Strong winds combined with high water levels could result in increased wave action that may impact shorelines and lakeside roads. The saturated ground also increases the chances of downed trees in strong winds.

Photo credit: KelownaNow

Photo collage taken at 6:00 a.m. at Rotary Beach (left and bottom right) Top right image shows Mission Creek.

UPDATE: May 21, 2017 at 4:00 p.m. Unseasonably warm weather will accelerate upper level snowpack melt

Unseasonably warm weather will accelerate upper level snowpack melt and expedite the rise of Okanagan Lake and area creeks over the next two to three days.

Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for the Central and South Okanagan including Kelowna and Penticton (click here). “A ridge is building over the southern Interior of British Columbia and will remain in place Monday and Tuesday, leading to unseasonably warm weather. This warm spell will accelerate snowmelt and lead to rising rivers, possibly causing concerns related to flooding.

The BC River Forecast Centre has issued a high streamflow advisory for the Okanagan, including Mission Creek. The advisory reads, “Snow melt rates are expected to increase significantly over the next few days. River levels are expected to respond to this snow melt, with increasing river levels expected throughout the Sunday to Tuesday, or Wednesday, period.”

Mission Creek’s watershed, at 1,794m (5,885.9ft), experienced 23 millimetres (1 inch) of melt on Saturday and has more than 500mm (19.69in) of snow water equivalent remaining. High elevation snow melt rates are expected to rise to 30-40mm (1.2-1.6in) per day, or higher, through Tuesday. For more information, please go to: http://bcrfc.env.gov.bc.ca/index.htm.

UPDATE: May 21, 2017 at 11:01 a.m. Okanagan Lake levels now 4 centimetres off 1990's flood level

Okanagan Lake water levels as of this morning are at 342.83, an increase of 3 centimetres from yesterday. We are now 4 centimetres off 1990's flood level and 17 centimetres away from this year’s projected peak of 343 metres. High temperatures are now causing the upper snowpack to melt. The lake will rise for approximately three more weeks.

Lakefront residents are urged to protect their properties from flooding if they have not already done so. To check whether a property needs flood protection, go to the Flood FAQs (frequently asked questions) section of www.cordemergency.ca/beprepared, which contains directions on how to measure for flood levels and build barriers to the appropriate height for the projected lake level and to account for wave action.

Boaters urged to stay off area lakes

UPDATE: May 20, 2017 at 8:00 a.m. Saturday's water levels increase 3 centimetres

Saturday's water levels as of 8:00 a.m. are 342.80 metres.

Between Friday and Saturday, the water levels has increased by 3 centimetres, as reported by CORD Emergency.

Mayor Colin Basran's Instagram post shows an illustration of lake levels.

Great illustration of the situation in #Kelowna right now.

A post shared by Colin Basran (@colin_basran) on

UPDATE: May 19, 2017 Okanagan Lake Dam is having to operate at a higher capacity than normal

Friday's water levels as of 5:25 a.m. has increased by 2.5 centimetres since Thursday.

The water level of Okanagan Lake is currently at 342.77 metres.

The Okanagan Lake Dam is having to operate at a higher capacity than normal, according to the gate keeper of the dam, Shaun Reimer.

<who> Photo Credit: KelownaNow </who> Left: Shaun Reimer at media conference for flooding of the Central Okanagan.

"Our designed discharge in cubic metres per second is 60. And that's not really for the dam, that's the channel immediately below the dam," said Shaun Reimer, head of public safety and protection for the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources. "But right now we are out just over 70 cubic metres per second, so we're kind of pushing the boundaries. We're really pushing the limits of impacting people all the way down."

According to Reimer, the dam's been releasing about 60 to 70 cubic metres per second for several weeks, barring a few days where it held at the 60 mark due to heavy rainfall.

"That adds so much water to the creeks and tributaries that come down in the Oliver area that it would push it up at levels that are going to be very, very concerning - both to erosion and to the people who live alongside the dyke," he said.

He added that the high water levels are starting to impact the residents as people living along the dyke in Oliver are finding the ground water is starting to pool.

According to Reimer, the Skaha Lake Dam and the McInture Dam (near Vaseux Lake) are running wide open.

"You can't open them any more," he said. "The water is just free-flowing through there."

Reimer expects the Okanagan Lake Dam to continue at the 60 to 70 cubic metres per second mark throughout part of the summer.

*For more information on the dam systems, read our story on: the Okanagan Lake water basin.

Photo credit: Dirk Handke

ORIGINAL STORY: Okanagan Lake's Water Levels, May 18, 2017

According to the Province's water level readings for Okanagan Lake, the levels rose almost two centimetres between Wednesday and Thursday.

According to CORD Emergency, the water levels have been fluctuating between two and three centimetres per day.

Wooden stakes run along the shores of Okanagan Lake, watching for how close levels are to reaching 343 metres.

If water levels exceed the 343-metre mark, then downtown and Mission areas of Kelowna could face more flooding.

<who> Photo Credit: KelownaNow </who> Water levels exceeding 343 metres could mean more flooding. The marker is from Mushroom beach.

<who> Photo Credit: KelownaNow </who> Shorelines of Okanagan Lake have risen significantly over the past month.

<who> Photo Credit: Government of Canada </who> Graph shows the increased water levels on Okanagan Lake between May 11th to May 18th, 2017.

CORD Emergency is cautious of suggesting it is seeing any particular trend with the data just yet, as a drastic change in temperature or more rain could greatly impact the levels.

However, the data does show at what point the water levels started to increase significantly and continue to climb.

<who> Photo Credit: KelownaNow </who> Half sunken dock by Mushroom Beach.

Looking back on the data, the most significant increase in Okanagan Lake's water levels occurred in early May.

<who> Photo Credit: Government of Canada </who> Graph shows the increase in water levels for Okanagan Lake from April 11th to May 17th, 2017.

The graph below shows the water levels between April 11th to May 18th in 2016.

<who> Photo Credit: Government of Canada </who> Numbers show the water levels of Okanagan Lake between April 11th to May 18th in 2016.

Remembering that the gate keeper of the Okanagan Lake dam, Shaun Reimer, said that between 1.5 and 1.75 centimetres of water can be released daily, the numbers need to show a bit more of a decline (as well as good weather conditions) before CORD Emergency and the Regional District can say there's a trending decline in water levels.

The Province and Regional District will be watching for rain and any drastic changes in temperature as potential contributing factors to rising water levels.

Still a few days out and with room for the weather to change, here's the forecast for Kelowna over the next seven days.

<who> Photo Credit: Weather.gc.ca

In the meantime, workers continue to build up the shorelines and fill bags for residents in the Okanagan.

The City of Kelowna staff and WildFire BC staff were out early Thursday morning shoveling sand into bags and barrels for added flood protection.

<who> Photo Credit: KelownaNow </who> Wild Fire BC between Mushroom Beach and Vimy Beach.

Flood protection barriers run all the way from City Park and along the shoreline by Vimy Beach.

<who> Photo Credit: KelownaNow </who> Mushroom Beach.

Summer staff with the City of Kelowna have a sand filling location at Gyro Beach. They're on day six of filling sand bags and loading them onto the pallets.

Each pallet holds 60 bags and then gets placed in the truck, ready to transport to various locations in the Okanagan.

<who> Photo Credit: KelownaNow </who> City of Kelowna Staff on day six of filling sand bags and loading pallets. Each pallet holds 60 bags.

Video courtesy: Dirk Handke.

A significant portion of Gyro Beach's shoreline has eroded, leaving piles of debris in its place.

<who> Photo Credit: KelownaNow </who> Gyro Beach debris.

The 343-metre marker at Gyro Beach still has plenty of the stake showing.

<who> Photo Credit: KelownaNow </who> Gyro Beach 343-metre marker.

Quickly flowing water and the adjacent riverbanks are potentially unsafe. Don’t approach washouts near rivers, creeks and culverts.

For KelownaNow's previous updates on the Okanagan Flooding, visit our State of Emergency page.



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