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UPDATE: Okanagan Lake well on its way to recovery

(UPDATE: June 23, 2017 @ 7:20 a.m.)

Over the last 24 hours, Okanagan Lake has receded 0.7 centimetres to bring the level at 4:25 a.m. to 343.140 metres.

In preparation for further recovery efforts, the public can help inventory the number, location and type of sandbags on private and public property in the Central Okanagan by using a new online application from Emergency Management BC (EMBC).

These are the daily lake levels since they peaked on Friday, June 9th:

  • Saturday morning June 10th, 2017: 343.243 (a drop of 0.8 centimetre)
  • Sunday morning June 11th, 2017: 343.243 (no change)
  • Monday morning June 12th, 2017: 343.240 (a drop of 0.3 centimetres)
  • Tuesday morning June 13th, 2017: 343.234 (a drop of 0.6 centimetres)
  • Wednesday morning June 14th, 2017: 343.218 (a drop of 1.6 centimetres)
  • Thursday morning June 15th, 2017: 343.214 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)
  • Friday Morning June 16th, 2017 343.207 (a drop of 0.7 centimetres)
  • Saturday morning June 17th, 2017: 343.203 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)
  • Sunday morning June 18th, 2017: 343.184 (a drop of 1.9 centimetres)
  • Monday morning June 19th, 2017: 343.181 (a drop of 0.3 centimetres)
  • Tuesday morning June 20th, 2017: 343.177 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)
  • Wednesday morning June 21st, 2017: 343.162 (a drop of 1.5 centimetres)
  • Thursday morning June 22nd, 2017: 343.147 (a drop of 1.5 centimetres)
  • Friday morning June 22nd, 2017: 343.140 (a drop of 0.7 centimetres)

Looking north towards #kelowna from #okanaganmountainpark - post by @mcolive

A post shared by KelownaNow (@kelownanow) on

(UPDATE: June 22, 2017 @ 7:05 a.m.)

Another good drop in levels over the past 24 hours brings the level down to 343.147 metres. The 24-hour reduction was 1.5 centimetres, making for a 3 centimetre drop over the past 48 hours.

According to Tom Wilson, communications manager for the City of Kelowna, "When Okanagan Lake gets below 343.0 level, the large bladder dams and gabion cages full of sand can be removed. But even then, it is not advised that boats travel at speeds that cause big wakes until the lake level is below what is called full-pool (342.48)."

The Cook Road boat launch in Kelowna has reopened, while the Water Street boat launch and Sutherland Bay launch remain closed.

Real-Time Hydrometric Data Graph for June 1, 2017 to June 22, 2017

For those that still look at everything in inches, it takes 2.54 centimetres to make one inch. The internet is full of converters, which you can find here.

These are the daily lake levels since they peaked on Friday, June 9th:

  • Saturday morning June 10th, 2017: 343.243 (a drop of 0.8 centimetre)
  • Sunday morning June 11th, 2017: 343.243 (no change)
  • Monday morning June 12th, 2017: 343.240 (a drop of 0.3 centimetres)
  • Tuesday morning June 13th, 2017: 343.234 (a drop of 0.6 centimetres)
  • Wednesday morning June 14th, 2017: 343.218 (a drop of 1.6 centimetres)
  • Thursday morning June 15th, 2017: 343.214 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)
  • Friday Morning June 16th, 2017 343.207 (a drop of 0.7 centimetres)
  • Saturday morning June 17th, 2017: 343.203 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)
  • Sunday morning June 18th, 2017: 343.184 (a drop of 1.9 centimetres)
  • Monday morning June 19th, 2017: 343.181 (a drop of 0.3 centimetres)
  • Tuesday morning June 20th, 2017: 343.177 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)
  • Wednesday morning June 21st, 2017: 343.162 (a drop of 1.5 centimetres)
  • Thursday morning June 22nd, 2017: 343.147 (a drop of 1.5 centimetres)

(UPDATE: June 21, 2017 @ 8:30 a.m.) - Lake level falls 1.5cm for the 2nd straight day

The drop for the last 24 hours is 1.5 centimetres, making the new level 343.162 metres as of 4:25 a.m.

KelownaNow did three stories flood-related stories yesterday:

(UPDATE: June 20th @ 7:30 a.m.)

Another a small drop for the Okanagan Lake. The level is now at 343.177 metres with the 0.4 centimetre drop recorded in the past 24 hours.

For those that still look at everything in inches, it takes 2.54 centimetres to make one inch. The internet is full of converters, you can click here one.

Saturday morning June 10, 2017: 343.243 (a drop of 0.8 centimetre)

Sunday morning June 11, 2017: 343.243 (no change)

Monday morning June 12, 2017: 343.240 (a drop of 0.3 centimetres)

Tuesday morning June 13, 2017: 343.234 (a drop of 0.6 centimetres)

Wednesday morning June 14, 2017: 343.218 (a drop of 1.6 centimetres)

Thursday morning June 15, 2017: 343.214 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)

Friday Morning June 16, 2017 343.207 (a drop of 0.7 centimetres)

Saturday morning June 17, 2017: 343.203 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)

Sunday morning June 18, 2017: 343.184 (a drop of 1.9 centimetres)

Monday morning June 19, 2017: 343.181 (a drop of 0.3 centimetres)

Tuesday morning June 20, 2017: 343.177 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)

Photo credit: Denise Egan

(UPDATE: June 19th @ 6:30 a.m.) - Okanagan Lake level chart looks promising

Okanagan Lake levels continue their slow decline from historic flood levels. Over the last 24 hours there was a drop of 0.3 centimetres or 3 millimetres.

One question we are often asked is why are some outlets reporting slightly different numbers on a daily basis? The short answer is that they are taking their readings at different times of the day and many times over different time periods. We have been consistently been reporting per 24 hour period at 4:25 a.m.

The other question is why do increases and decreases differ day to day? A number of factors come into play with this. One of the main reasons is that the lake is a fluid body and the readings are affected by that. If you look at the table data for the real-time recordings you will see ups and downs for every five-minute reporting, but there is an overall trend in the numbers and data must be looked at over longer periods to see the trend. Lower lows or higher highs over time make a trend.

Keep the questions coming! You can send them to News@KelownaNow.com, no question is too silly.

For those that still look at everything in inches, it takes 2.54 centimetres to make one inch. The internet is full of converters, you can click here one.

Saturday morning June 10, 2017: 343.243 (a drop of 0.8 centimetre)

Sunday morning June 11, 2017: 343.243 (no change)

Monday morning June 12, 2017: 343.240 (a drop of 0.3 centimetres)

Tuesday morning June 13, 2017: 343.234 (a drop of 0.6 centimetres)

Wednesday morning June 14, 2017: 343.218 (a drop of 1.6 centimetres)

Thursday morning June 15, 2017: 343.214 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)

Friday Morning June 16, 2017 343.207 (a drop of 0.7 centimetres)

Saturday morning June 17, 2017: 343.203 (a drop of 0.4 centimetres)

Sunday morning June 18, 2017: 343.184 (a drop of 1.9 centimetres)

Monday morning June 19, 2017: 343.181 (a drop of 0.3 centimetres)

(UPDATE: June 18th @ 7:00 a.m.)

Over the past 24 hours, we recorded the biggest one-day drop so far with a 1.9 centimetre drop to take the lake level to 343.184 metres. This makes it eight of the last nine days where we are seeing declines. We are still 70 centimetres over what is called a full pool for Okanagan Lake. The full pool target is 342.480 metres. Keep in mind that the full pool number is a number set by the ministry and does not mean any number above it means flooding. Inland properties began removal of flood protection on June 16, 2017. Lakeshore properties are still vulnerable to weather events and should keep flood protection barriers in place until lake levels subside.

It will be great to get back to showcasing photos of our beautiful Okanagan Lake where it does not look to be so threatening.

If I ever miss the shot I know @brandon.boot has my back πŸ“ΈπŸ€™πŸš #ikonadventures

A post shared by IKON ADVENTURES (@ikonadventures) on

(UPDATE: June 17th @ 7:00 a.m.) - Okanagan Lake continues downward trend

Okanagan Lake's water levels dropped again in the past 24 hours. Since yesterday, there's been a 0.4-centimetre drop to bring the level down to 343.203 metres. The forecast calls for lighter winds today with little rain in the forecast for the next 14 days. Less rain should help the long, slow process of draining the lake from its record high levels.

Wind continues to the be a threatening variable when combined with the high lake levels. Inland properties that were threatened by flooding, were told yesterday that flood protection measures could come down.

Photo credit: Denise Egan - Rotary Beach - June 16, 2017

(UPDATE: June 16th @ 6:45 a.m.) - Lake levels drop for the 6th time in 7 days

Despite a few showers on Thursday, lake levels decreased for the sixth time in the past week.

Okanagan Lake dropped 0.7 centimetres between Thursday morning and Friday morning and now sits at 343.207 metres.

Winds picked up at times on Thursday, but they never lived up to Environment Canada's 60km/h predictions, which was a nice break for Kelowna's flood barriers.

Friday's forecast calls for a mix of sun and clouds with a high of 22°C, as well as winds around 20km/h with a small chance of showers this afternoon.

(Original story: June 15th @ 7:30 a.m.) - The Okanagan has been rocked by flooding for more than a month now.

Lake levels have steadily risen from 342.68 metres on May 15th to a peak of 343.251m on June 9th.

Since then, however, lake levels finally appear to be going in the right direction.

Five of the last six days have seen the lake level drop, including a 1.6 centimetre drop between the mornings of Tuesday, June 13th and Wednesday, June 14th.

<who>Photo Credit: KelownaNow</who>City Park Beach in early June.

Here's a breakdown of how lake levels rose during May and into June, before they hit a peak on June 9th.

  • Okanagan Lake full pool: 342.48m
  • Monday, May 15th, 2017: 342.68m (+20cms)
  • Monday, May 22nd, 2017: 342.86m (+18cms)
  • Monday, May 29th, 2017: 343.08cms (+22cms)
  • Friday, June 9th, 2017: 343.251 (+17.1cms)
  • Friday, June 16th, 2017: 343.207cms (-4.4cms)

To find out what evacuation orders are still in place, check out this map on the CORD website.

Environment Canada has put a special weather statement in effect that calls for strong winds in the Okanagan on Thursday, which you can learn more about here.

<who>Photo Credit: KelownaNow</who>Rotary Beach in early June.

Despite slowly improving lake levels, officials are asking residents to keep sandbags in place and even reinforce certain barriers until told otherwise, but you can learn more about that and what the cleanup may entail here.

Twice during the last month we took to the air to get a bird's eye view of the Okanagan, which you can view here and here.

<who>Photo Credit: KelownaNow</who>One of our many photos from above Kelowna.

We will update this story as information becomes available and as water levels change.

To see our flood story containing updates between May 15th and June 14th, click this link.


 
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